Archive – Ancient Coinage

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Much Ado About Some Coins

The Egyptian Museum hosts a coin exhibition – and media’s response is tremendous... more ]

Finally a good joke!

Coins from the time when the Israelites moved to Egypt found in the basement of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo?
The online edition of the Mideast Jerusalem Post from September 25th, 2009, reported that in the archives of the Egyptian Museum, among a multitude of unsorted artifacts, coins were ... more ]

Egypt and Alexandria. A brief numismatic survey

In this series Ursula Kampmann invites you to a trip though the history of Egypt and its capital Alexandria by its coinage. more ]

British Museum presents major Egypt exhibition

Under the title “Egypt: faith after the pharaohs”, the British Museum presents a fascinating exhibition until February 7, 2016. Dealing with 1,200 years of Egyptian history, it provides unparalleled insight into the lives of different religious communities. more ]

ANS launches online catalogue with Egyptian National Library

The American Numismatic Society announced the digital publication of the non-hoard numismatic collection of the Egyptian National Library, in collaboration with the universities of Washington and Cairo. more ]

Sunken Cities: British Museum’s first major exhibition of underwater archaeology

‘Sunken cities: Egypt’s lost worlds’ is the British Museum’s first large-scale exhibition of underwater archaeological discoveries and runs through 27 November 2016. It tells the story of two lost Egyptian cities and their recent rediscovery beneath the Mediterranean seabed. more ]

Egypt's former minister says antiquities should stay abroad

Most Egyptian artefacts held abroad were exported legally, says Egypt’s former Antiquities Minister and argues that it is in his country’s interests to leave them where they are. more ]

Antiquities trade in Egypt

There are books we have been anticipating for years. This is one of them. It paints a detailed picture of the Egyptian antiquities trade, not black, not white, but with many shades of grey. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at the book. more ]

German scenographer redesigns Egyptian Museum

The famous Egyptian Museum will be replaced by the Grand Egyptian Museum at Gizeh featuring the most important exhibition of Egyptian objects. A German scenographer has won the competition of designing the exhibition. more ]

The Delian League and the Athenian Money

In 479 BC the Greeks defeated the Persians at Plataiai. At that time nobody dared to hope that the fight was so soon to end. On the contrary, every Greek city was afraid of the Persian king, who had vast resources at his disposal. He was feared to raise another army in order to conquer the whole of Greece. Something had to be done to prevent that. more ]

Dionysos - A God of the Greek Religion of Experiences

Most of us react uncomprehendingly while reading the Greek myths. We can't imagine that once rational human beings were able to believe in gods who behaved like characters invented for a soap opera on TV. Legends tell us about adultery, violation, theft, intrigue and fraud. more ]

The Colts of Corinth

This beautiful early stater of Corinth bears Pegasus on its obverse. The winged horse was the symbol of Corinth and each citizen of this important seaport felt the whole city and himself connected with this winged horse. Why did he do so and how did this connection come into being? more ]

Ainos - A Commercial Center in Thrace

Ainos, today called Enez and located on the border of the Aegean Sea in the European part of Turkey, didn't have any important resources. As far as we know, there also didn't exist any remarkable industry. Ainos reached incredible wealth during the 5th century B.C. despite these facts. more ]

I am the badge of Phanes

On March 8th, 2010, Gorny & Mosch will present a specimen of the mysterious key series of the early coin production. The Phanes stater from a private collection in Israel is estimated at 150.000 Euros. It is the ...
more ]

Olympia and the Eleans - The introduction of the cult of Hera

For us Olympia seems to be equivalent to the peaceful contest of all nations. In referring to ancient tradition we forget entirely that ... more ]

Sikyon and its Chimaira

Why do we find Chimaira on the staters of the city of Sikyon? A search for traces...
more ]

The Laurion silver

But one day, one noon, I believed I had found it. I was at Sounion all by myself; the summerly sun was burning; the wounded pines dripped resin... more ]

Heracles the snake-strangler

Herakles strangling the snakes, this subject occurs on the coins of some very important harbor towns of Asia Minor at the same time. This article will explain what’s behind it... more ]

The coins of Philipp II of Macedonia

Philipp II ranges amongst the most important rulers of Antiquity. He transformed the small and endangered Macedonia into one of the most powerful kingdoms of the Ancient world. His coins circulated in all of Greece and bought him what he needed - loyalty, politicians, mercenary soldiers... more ]

The coins of Alexander III the Great of Macedonia

Few historical figures have spurred people’s imagination like Alexander, King of the Macedonians. Up to the present day, his coins range amongst those every coin collector likes to add to his collection. Fortunately, these pieces come in great numbers, so that every collector can afford at least one specimen! more ]

Under the eyes of Artemis

The upcoming sale of Numismatica Genevensis SA on November 30, 2010 offers a unique gold stater struck by the citizens of Abydos. Here’s the story behind... more ]

Big price for an emergency coin

The city of Syracuse issued a marvelous gold coin during its war against the Carthaginians. A perfect specimen of this emission sold for 66.700 Euro during the last auction sale of Gorny & Mosch... more ]

And this is where Aristotle was wrong…

Aristotle, in his work on the structure of the Tarentine government, likewise described the coins of the city. He remarked that they depicted Taras, son of Poseidon, riding a dolphin. Was he right? Or is there another, more possible, option? more ]

80,000 Euros for a work of two Sicilian die cutters

For an impressive amount of money some extraordinary Greek coins were auctioned at Gorny & Mosch’s, Giessener Münzhandlung on October 10. One of them is a remarkable tetradrachm from Syracuse whose story you will read here… more ]

Alexander of Abonuteichos – a lesson from Asia Minor about gullibility in the 2nd cent. A. D.

You are one of those people who believe than there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy? Well, you are in accordance with a deep-seated tradition and can appeal to the fact that already in antiquity there were people who thought the same as you. .. more ]

Great is Artemis of the Ephesians

On his visit to Ephesus, St. Paul was in imminent danger to be lynched. Why was it that the Ephesians felt so threatened by this herald of a new god? Were they more pious than other Greeks? They were, in a way, since they lived on their religion… more ]

“Sing, Muse, of the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles…”

You believe that Paris abducted Helena? Which was why the Greek destroyed Troy? What if it was completely different? The later Trojans in Roman Imperial Times adhered to an entirely different version of the story – and so they celebrated their hero Hector on their coins. more ]

Bread for Tarsus

In the 3th cent., Asia Minor was famine-stricken. The city of Tarsus scored a coup that made the emperor leave the grain necessary for survival to it at a cheap rate. A coin tells of how that was achieved. more ]

A King Named Teutamados

Beyond his name, there’s very little known about Teutamados. What we do have, however, is a splendid tetradrachm minted for him. Based on this, he was evidently a Paionian ruler. more ]

The ‘Modest Aphrodite’ from Nysa-Scythopolis (Beth Shean) and Ptolemais (Akko)

A comparison between a statue of Aphrodite found at Beth Shean and a coin type from the mint of Ptolemais reminds us of the realistic nature of statues appearing on city coins. more ]

Human Faces Part 2: Athena and Athens

Why is it that for centuries – or rather thousands of years – the head has served as the motif for the side of a coin? And why has this changed in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann poses these questions in her book ‘MenschenGesichter,’ from which the texts for our new series are taken. more ]

Human Faces Part 4: Philip II as Hegemon of Greece

Why is it that for centuries – or rather thousands of years – the head has served as the motif for the side of a coin? And why has this changed in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann poses these questions in her book ‘MenschenGesichter,’ from which the texts for our new series are taken. more ]

Ancient Sybrita: the mint where the most beautiful of Crete’s coins were made

The ancient community of Sybrita in Crete stills remains something of a terra incognita. That is even the more surprising given the fact that gorgeous silver coins had been produced there in Hellenistic times that celebrate Dionysos, the god of the wine. more ]

Macedonia becomes a province

A rare Macedonian tetradrachm, minted around 147 B. C., tells a story from the beginnings of the Roman province of Macedonia. The rarity is to be auctioned off in the upcoming Künker autumn auction sale to be conducted between the 7th and the 11th October 2013. more ]

Human Faces Part 9: The Battle of Macedonia against Rome

Why is it that for centuries – or rather thousands of years – the head has served as the motif for the side of a coin? And why has this changed in the last 200 years? This chapter of the series ‘Human Faces’ looks at the battle between Macedonia and Rome. more ]

A Weight from the Empire of the Seleucids

A huge elephant is depicted on the weight that was auctioned off on 18th December 2013 in auction sale Gorny & Mosch 218 – Ancient Art. It is of interest not just to the art lover but to everyone concerned with ancient metrology. After all, both the shekel and the drachm is based on the mine, i.e. the unit represented by this weight. more ]

A cownapper as royal role model

On 10 March 2014, an octodrachm of the Edones tribe will be auctioned off at Gorny & Mosch featuring on its obverse Hermes who, after just being born, stole the cattle from Apollo. One wonders why King Getas chose that scene to be depicted on his coins. more ]

The Punic Goddess

On Friday, March 13, 2015, Künker auctions off a Siculo-Punic coin with an enigmatic depiction: on the obverse we see a beautiful woman with a Phrygian cap. Is it Dido? Is it Tanit? Or is it perhaps a completely different goddess? more ]

Sicilian Mosaic Part 10: Rescue by the Mother City of Corinth

After the murder of Dion, the ruler of Syracuse, his followers looked for help in Corinth, where the founding settlers of Syracuse had come from many centuries ago. And Timoleon in fact succeeded in stabilizing the Syracusan region. more ]

Sicilian Mosaic Part 11: The classical coinage of Syracuse

Syracusan coins are among the most beautiful strikings of antiquity. Have a look at a few examples in the following. more ]

Sicilian Mosaic Part 12: Naxos and Leontinoi

Naxos was the first Greek city founded on Sicily. Today we take a look at its coins, as well as the coins of Leontinoi, founded by Naxos, and Catane. more ]

Forth known stater of Phanes sold for 345.000 Euro

All attendants of the sale Gorny & Mosch, Munich 185 were thrilled, when lot no. 146 was opened on March 8th, 2010... more ]

The Amazons – Mysterious Warrior Maidens

The historical museum of Speyer presents objects, which have never before been shown in public and which shall proof that the amazons once existed...
more ]

Heracles to Alexander the Great: Treasures from the Royal Capital of Macedon, a Hellenic Kingdom in the Age of Democracy

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford presents a unique exhibition on the Macedonian kingdom. Over five hundred treasures will be on display, all recently found in the royal burial tombs and the palace of Aegae... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 6

What is there to be found in Pherai, the city where once upon a time such beautiful coins were produced, like the ones that reached record prices in Zurich only recently? Does reality match up with the coins’ testimony? But first a trip to Mount Olympus. more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 8

Illustrious names spring to mind when thinking of Chalkidiki. Akanthos and Terone, Uranopolis and Olynthos. But not everywhere reality answers expectations… more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 9

Stageira, Neapolis, Mesembria, Maroneia and Abdera – these are today’s destinations. We see magnificent archaeological excavations that are particularly well-kept. On the other hand, we experience some a disappointment. As always, it is going to be a colorful kaleidoscope with impressions from Northern Greece... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 10

Amphipolis and Philippi are the destinations of issue no. 10. They were once incredibly rich cities whose citizens earned their living with the trade of gold, silver and building timber. .. more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 11

Our journey home from Northern Greece to Loerrach took six days – and it was an adventure. This is part one, from Macedonia to Delphi: we visit Pella, suffer a Greek village festival and arrive at the hot sources at the Thermopylae. In addition, Thebes and Chaironea are on our agenda... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 7

Today’s stage takes us to several highlights of the journey: a peak of kindness in Pydna, a touristic highlight in the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki and a climax of the fight about the Greek austerity package... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 5

The fifth stage of our journey is dedicated to Dion, perhaps the most beautiful excavation in Northern Greece. And Dion was important in antiquity: Alexander sacrificed to Zeus in Dion, before he set out to conquer the world... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 4

On the fourth stage of her journey throughout Greece, Ursula Kampmann is looking for the ancient Aigai (one of so many…), an open museum and the magnificent tombs of Vergina... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 3

During her third stage of the journey throughout Greece, Ursula Kampmann visits Ioannina where she meets numismatist Katerini Liampi. The local museum is richly equipped with coins. Great mosques refer to the Ottoman heritage, the Kastro to the “Mohammedan Napoleon”... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 2

During the second stage of Ursula Kampmann’s journey to Greece, she wades through icy-cold Acheron, River of the Dead, descends to the realm of the dead and visits the oak of Dodona. There she introduces us to the world of ancient oracles... more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 1

The first stage of Ursula Kampmann’s journey to Greece takes her from Venice to Igoumenitsa and Nicopolis up to Ambracia. Hidden mosaics and fateful padlocks render the area’s visit quite difficult. But there is enough left to discover! more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece – Part 12

The last stage of our journey throughout Greece takes us to Delphi. On our trip back, however, we were in danger of faring like Odysseus who, when heading home, was carried off course… more ]

Sagalassos – City of Dreams. The ‘Pompeii of Anatolia’ in exhibition

The Gallo-Romeins Museum in Tongeren, Belgium, holds an exhibition on the ancient city of Sagalassos. The exhibition runs from October 29, 2011 to June 17, 2012 and shows mega-images and hundreds of objects... more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 1

It’s grey, it’s cold, it’s dark. Sometimes you don’t believe that it’s ever going to be light again. Enjoy a little breeze of the Turkish summer in the dead of winter. This diary of some numismatically highly interesting but barely visited sites in Turkey was written in 2009. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 2

Silifke, ancient Seleucia on the Calycadnus, is a small provincial town in the middle of nowhere nearby which once Frederick Barbarossa drowned. Follow us on our way to the ancient metropolis Antioch and into the marvellous grove of Daphne, that even today is in the modern Antiochenes’ favour as an important area for recreation. more ]

The Immortal Alexander the Great – The myth, the reality, his journey, his legacy

Did you like our last article of the week? Now you have the chance to see originals of that period in Amsterdam! more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 3

Do you know Antep and its fabulous museum with mosaics? If not, I strongly recommend it to you. Antep is a pleasant town where you quickly feel at home. Urfa, ancient Edessa, in contrast, can’t be recommended for women traveling on their own. And if you do, you will need steady nerves. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 4

Only a few images stick to your mind so powerfully as the huge heads of the broken monumental statues of Nemrut Dag. During our trip there, however, we have seen many other things: marvelous rocky landscapes, a magnificent bridge from Roman Times and lots of friendly people. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 5

Caesarea Cappadocia – only few cities in the Roman provinces possessed an equally comprehensive coinage yet barely anything Roman is still extant in the city. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 6

Ankyra is a name familiar to anyone interested in the history of the Roman emperors. The Monumentum Ancyranum is a magnificent insight into the image cultivation of Emperor Augustus. Turkish Ankara, however, has much more to offer. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 7

You don’t have to introduce Istanbul. Everyone knows the beautiful city at Bosporus River. This was our last stop on our journey across Turkey. After having been to areas with barely any touristic infrastructure it was almost a civilization shock to finally get anything again a tourist would wish. more ]

Temple of Aphrodite in Thessaloniki cleansed

When we reported on a citizen initiative in Thessaloniki aiming at the rescue of a Greek temple, we had not thought that we would be really of help to those people. But we were: they were officially permitted to act by themselves. How? Read it here. more ]

International Congress on electrum coins at Israel Museum, Jerusalem

The new coin exhibition “White Gold: Revealing the World’s Earliest Coins” will formally open on June 26, 2012 at the renewed exhibition space of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. On this occasion a two-day international congress will be held. more ]

White Gold – exhibition in the Israel Museum

Electrum coins are among the most fascinating coinages because they are right at the beginning of Western numismatics. Unfortunately the decisive facts are still contested. The Israel Museum has just opened an exhibition on electrum issues and on that occasion held an important congress. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009)

In the summer 2009 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Turkey – of course searching for numismatic traces as she always does. She condensed her impressions in a diary whose single parts we have gathered here. more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece (2011)

In summer 2011 Ursula Kampmann travelled Greece writing about her numismatic – and other – experiences a vivid diary. Here are all part gathered. more ]

Jerusalem Electrum Congress Films online

In June 2012 an electrum congress took place in Jerusalem generating new discussions and giving many fresh ideas on this topic. Now videos show all papers given during this event. more ]

Basel displays objects from desert town Petra

Until March 17, 2013 the Antikenmuseum Basel displays an exhibition about Petra, capital of the Nabataeans in the Jordanian desert. Nabataean art and many events take the visitors into a remote world. more ]

French National Library puts 130,000 coins online

The French National Library is making available 130,000 Greek and Roman provincial coins in an online database. This monumental project is expected to be concluded by the end of 2013, but numerous coins are searchable already. more ]

Egyptian customs triumphs

Right at the border the Egyptian Antiquities Unit Bureau collaborating perfectly with the Antiquities and Tourism Police saved a priceless cultural object worth at least 100 euros from disappearing abroad. more ]

Egypt and Alexandria. A brief numismatic survey

In this series Ursula Kampmann invites you to a trip though the history of Egypt and its capital Alexandria by its coinage. more ]

François de Callatay on the beauty of Greek coins

During the Brussels Ancient Art Fair 2013 Belgian expert on Greek coins François de Callatay gave a lecture on the beauty of Greek coins which is now available online. In this stimulating lecture he asked why to virtually all numismatists these coins are the most beautiful ever made. more ]

Human faces

Why was the human head the motif on coins for centuries, no, for millennia? And why did that change in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann is looking for answers to these questions in her book “Menschengesichter” (“Human faces”), from which the texts in this series are taken. more ]

The Thirty Years' War

Both religion and power were the focal points of the Thirty Years’ War that shook the whole of Europe during the 17th century. Ursula Kampmann brings that era alive. more ]

The Lokrians of Opous

There is this wonderful coinage with the unpronounceable name: the starters with Demeter’s head on the obverse and fighting Ajax on the reverse. A monograph has now been published that enlightens us about the Lokrians of Opous. Ursula Kampmann has taken a closer look at it. more ]

New web portal for Thracian coins

The Corpus Nummorum Thracorum has created a new web portal collecting virtually thousands of Thracian coins for research. An impressive amount of data, a clear interface and sophisticated search options are offered for free. more ]

The Coinage of the Scythian Kings in the West Pontic Area

Dimitar Draganov has submitted a detailed die study for the coins minted by the Skythian kings that will become the new standard reference for this coinage. Ursula Kampmann has taken a closer look at it. more ]

American Numismatic Society Launches PELLA

The American Numismatic Society has launched its latest digital platform, PELLA, an important new research tool for ancient Greek numismatics that provides an online catalogue of the coinage produced by the kings of the Macedonian Argead dynasty (c.700 and 310 BC). more ]

Exhibition in Fairfield, Connecticut: “Hair in the Classical World”

The Bellarmine Museum of Art at Fairfield University opened an exhibition on “Hair in the Classical World.” On display are objects and images from the Bronze Age through late Antiquity, including sculptures and, of course, coins. more ]

New ANS grant project on hoard analysis

HARP is the title of the latest grant project of the American Numismatic Society, aiming to create a tool that provides a global analysis of patterns of coinage circulation from Archaic to Byzantine times. more ]

ANS launches online catalogue with Egyptian National Library

The American Numismatic Society announced the digital publication of the non-hoard numismatic collection of the Egyptian National Library, in collaboration with the universities of Washington and Cairo. more ]

Museum of American Finance to Open Gold Exhibition

“Worth Its Weight” is the title of an exhibition that will be shown on Wall Street, New York, opening on November 19, 2015. Organized by the Museum of American Finance, it will feature more than 100 unique and rare gold objects. more ]

Hixenbaugh Ancient Art Presents “ART of WAR” exhibition

Hixenbaugh Ancient Art currently shows their gallery exhibition, “ART of WAR.” The exhibition brings together an unprecedented accumulation of weapons and armor from ancient Greece. more ]

Maccabees and Seleucids as reflected in coins

It is never easy to write Jewish history. Too many emotions are involved. The Maccabean Revolt is no exception. By including the coins, David M. Jacobson arrives at a much more nuanced picture. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at his book. more ]

Greek Colonisation: New Data, Current Approaches

The Proceedings of a congress held on February 6, 2015 organized by the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki and the Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection have been published. more ]

British Museum presents an exhibition on 4000 years of Sicilian art

The British Museum shows the impressive exhibition ‘Sicily: culture and conquest’. Over 4000 years of history on the island are explored through objects in the museum’s own collection alongside outstanding loans from Sicily and around the world. more ]

Pergamon and the Hellenistic Kingdoms of the Ancient World

The New York Met is showing the exhibition “Pergamon and the Hellenistic Kingdoms of the Ancient World” featuring many important loans from abroad particularly from the Pergamon Museum Berlin. Among the objects there are also coins from the ANS. more ]

The Hellenistic World - Using Coins as Sources

In collaboration with the ANS, Cambridge University Press releases a new series where leading scholars provide an overview of the ongoing research in their area of expertise. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at the first volume covering the Hellenistic world. more ]

Sunken Cities: British Museum’s first major exhibition of underwater archaeology

‘Sunken cities: Egypt’s lost worlds’ is the British Museum’s first large-scale exhibition of underwater archaeological discoveries and runs through 27 November 2016. It tells the story of two lost Egyptian cities and their recent rediscovery beneath the Mediterranean seabed. more ]

Sicilian Mosaic

The history of Sicily is shaped by the geographical situation of the island in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. Many peoples went through the country. Their trading, their wars and their peaceful coexistence are reflected on the coins. All parts of the series you may find here. more ]

“The Emperor’s Gold” at Kunsthistorisches Museums Vienna

As part of the 125th anniversary celebrations of the Kunsthistorisches Museum the Coin Cabinet is showing a special exhibition running until 5 March 2017 featuring selected gold coins from the Emperor’s coin collection. more ]

Women in the Seleucid Empire

What part did women play in the rule of the Greco-Macedonian kings? A collection of essays deals with this question by scoping the Seleucid women. Ursula Kampmann has had a look at it. more ]

Digital mediation on Gallica.fr

Digital mediation on Gallica.fr is making the Bibliothèque nationale de France’s Coin department’s collections more accessible. Julien Olivier presents the development of thematic itineraries through the Greek and Roman coins collections. more ]

eBay's fight against hatred and discrimination

eBay has recently pulled a boner in a class of its own. The popular portal for sales of any kind removed an ancient coin from the German version of the digital market place because of the use of Nazi symbols. more ]

“It could not be imagined in a more magnificent way!”

This is how the title translates under which the Festschrift for the 65th birthday of Dieter Salzmann was published and when holding these two comprehensive volumes in your hands, one can only agree to the title. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the Festschrift. more ]

Ancient Greece Meets Modern Art

During the Liverpool Biennial 2016 Tate Liverpool has turned its first floor galleries into Ancient Greece. Until 16 October 2016 visitors encounter classical sculptures from the collection of National Museums Liverpool, alongside newly commissioned artworks. more ]

Getty Museum exhibits ancient sculptures from the SBMA

A special installation at the J. Paul Getty Museum currently puts on view 14 works of Greek and Roman art from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Due to extensive conservation work, the sculptures, most of them stemming from the Ludington Collection, shine in new splendor. more ]

Oxford exhibits Treasures from the Sicilian Seas

“Storms, War and Shipwreck” reads the title of a presentation currently on display in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, UK. More than 200 objects rescued from the bottom of the sea illustrate the island’s rich history. The exhibition can be viewed through September 25, 2016. more ]

Oxford displays coins of Alexander the Great

As part of the Oxford-Paris Alexander project, the Ashmolean Museum presents a display of the coins of Alexander the Great. It can be viewed at Oxford through April 23, 2017. more ]

Armenian Coinage in the Classical Period

Classical Numismatic Group have published the latest volume in their Classical Numismatic Studies series, Armenian Coinage in the Classical Period by Frank L. Kovacs. A new reference book comprising many recently discovered coins was much needed. more ]

Lycian coins

Lycian coins in European private collections – that is the title of Wilhelm Müseler’s latest publication. It turned out to be much more than a simple catalogue. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Egypt's former minister says antiquities should stay abroad

Most Egyptian artefacts held abroad were exported legally, says Egypt’s former Antiquities Minister and argues that it is in his country’s interests to leave them where they are. more ]

Antiquities trade in Egypt

There are books we have been anticipating for years. This is one of them. It paints a detailed picture of the Egyptian antiquities trade, not black, not white, but with many shades of grey. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at the book. more ]

Hoards in Syria

Frédérique Duyrat has published a weighty monograph on hoards in Syria. It is more than a numismatic study. The author asks the fundamental question how and when all the Syrian coins were incorporated into Western collections. Ursula Kampmann took a look. more ]

Boii and Taurisci

A new volume on the Celtic finds from Oberleiserberg, a Celtic settlement roughly 50 km north of Vienna, has been published. Among others, it contains interesting essays on numismatic topics. Ursula Kampmann took a look. more ]

NEH Funds the ANS’s Hellenistic Royal Coinages Project

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded the American Numismatic Society a substantial grant to fund the web-based Hellenistic Royal Coinages project which promises to help fundamentally with identifying and researching Hellenistic royal coinages. more ]

Words and Coins

A completely different exhibition concept was the basis of a 2012 exhibition held in Cologny, a suburb of Geneva, the catalog of which we present here. It focused on words and images, on books and coins. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the catalog. more ]

British Museum exhibition explores Scythians

Organised with the St. Petersburg State Hermitage Museum, the London British Museum presents “Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia”. Running to January 14, 2018, this is the first major exhibition in the UK in 40 years that reveals all aspects of Scythian life. more ]

Cassander copper coins from 1914 Pella Excavations re-published

The 1914 excavations in the region of Pella unearthed copper coins minted in the name of Cassander enriching our poor knowledge of his coinage. Demetrius Siatras makes this edition from 1918/1921 available again. The advantage: The Greek text was translated into English. more ]

CNG’s Handbook of Greek Coins: Macedon and Its Neighbors

CNG has published the tenth published volume in The Handbook of Greek Coinage series: “Handbook of Coins of Macedon and Its Neighbors. Part II: Thrace, Skythia, and Taurike, Sixth to First Centuries BC” (the second part of Volume 3 in the series). more ]

ANS provides online image-zooming feature

The American Numismatic Society will make its highest-resolution images available. With 160,000 numismatic objects photographed thus far, this will enable researchers to zoom down into minute details, in order to assist them in their work. more ]

Agrippa’s Meeting of Kings at Tiberias

Josephus tells us of a most interesting meeting in Tiberias, apparently convened by Agrippa I (37-44 CE), grandson of Herod the Great, probably around 42 CE...
more ]

Helena, the First Christian Pilgrim

Inspired by a visit of the church of Santa Croce. David Hendin recalls to us the story of Helena, mother of Constantine, a "rags to riches" story, which ends with the first Christian pilgrim establishing the tradition of pilgrimage to the Holy Land and bringing to Rome pieces of the True Cross... more ]

Pilgrim’s Ring and Coin of the Jewish War

This is the story of a ring, bought from an Arab in Jerusalem, the feasts of Shavout and Sukkot and a coin of the Jewish War... more ]

Surcharge of the Money Changers

Do you know, why there were money changers in the Temple of Jerusalem and how much they did earn? No, you don’t? Well, then you should read the article of David Hendin on this very special detail of every day’s life in the ancient Holy Land... more ]

The coin in the fish’s mouth

Matthew 17:24-27 reports that Peter found a coin in a fish’s mouth, which was meant for paying the Temple tribute. David Hendin explains what kind of coin it was and what was the most common silver coin in the ancient Holy Land... more ]

The temple of Zeus Hypsistos on Mount Gerizim near Neapolis

Present-day Nablus in Palestine had an intriguing history in antiquity. On near-by Mount Gerizim an old sanctuary of the Samaritans was situated which the Greeks and Romans re-interpreted and dedicated to Zeus. Only coins bear witness of the former significance of the temple. more ]

The ‘Modest Aphrodite’ from Nysa-Scythopolis (Beth Shean) and Ptolemais (Akko)

A comparison between a statue of Aphrodite found at Beth Shean and a coin type from the mint of Ptolemais reminds us of the realistic nature of statues appearing on city coins. more ]

New Exhibition of the ANS at the Fed: Coins of the Holy Land

A new exhibition, organized by the American Numismatic Society in conjunction with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, illustrates the economic and religious aspects of the coins of the Near East... more ]

‘Wailing Wall’ built after Herod

Archaeological excavations permit a new view on one of the most contentious religious places of the whole world, the Jerusalem Temple Mount. Until now it was believed to be erected by King Herod. Coins point to a later completion... more ]

Numismatics in Jerusalem – Part 1

Actually, numismatics concentrates on quite a narrow space in Jerusalem. There is the Israel Museum, which accommodates beside its own collection the Israel Antiquities Authority as well. And only a fifteen minutes’ walk from there you will find the exhibition of the Bank of Israel. Follow us today to a visit at the Israel Museum. more ]

Free Bible Coin Reference is Updated

Mel Wacks’ Handbook of Biblical Numismatics is a reference work published online free of charge. Now, it has been updated. It features current prices and the numbers of the new Hendin manual. more ]

Coin hoard found in Israel

In the course of an archaeological excavation in southern Israel nearby Qiryat Gat a treasure hoard was found some weeks ago. Around 140 gold and silver coins and sumptuous gold jewellery date probably to the Bar Kokhba Revolt 132-135 AD. more ]

Egypt and Alexandria. A brief numismatic survey

In this series Ursula Kampmann invites you to a trip though the history of Egypt and its capital Alexandria by its coinage. more ]

Israel Museum showcases ‘first Jewish coin’

A very generous couple of collectors donated 1,200 Persian coins to the Israel Museum, most of them minted for the Palestinian provinces. Among these coins a drachm may be the first known to be minted for the province of Judah. more ]

Coinage and Power in Ancient Israel

The coin collection of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna presents until September 13, 2015 the exhibition “Coinage and Power in Ancient Israel“. The pieces from the Israel Museum in Jerusalem demonstrate the political and religious changes ancient Israel experienced. more ]

Bronze Portraits of the Emperor Hadrian in Jerusalem

Three extant bronze portraits of Emperor Hadrian are brought together for a first-time display in Jerusalem’s Israel Museum featuring loans from the British Museum and the Louvre. The exhibition concludes the Israel Museum’s celebrations of its 50th anniversary. more ]

Maccabees and Seleucids as reflected in coins

It is never easy to write Jewish history. Too many emotions are involved. The Maccabean Revolt is no exception. By including the coins, David M. Jacobson arrives at a much more nuanced picture. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at his book. more ]

Numismatic report of Khirbet Qeiyafa excavation

More than 600 coins and related objects from the end of the sixth century BCE to the British Mandate were found at Khirbet Qeiyafa (Israel) during the 2007-2013 excavation seasons. Now a comprehensive excavation report of the numismatic findings has been published. more ]

Hasmonean Silver Coins Cache Discovered

An important hoard of silver coins dating to the Hasmonean period was exposed in an archaeological excavation in Israel. The site shows that Jews lived there among Pagans – and they did not mind using Seleucid money while instigating the Maccabean revolt. more ]

7th C BCE Papyrus Contradicts UNESCO Resolution

An ancient papyrus fragment that includes the name “Jerusalem” in its text is now part of a continuing political argument which was lightened by a UNESCO resolution. Kate Fitz Gibbon explains what has happened. more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Jewish coin as political argument?

A week ago the Israeli press announced a nine-year-old girl had found a Jewish coin from the time of the First Jewish-Roman War in the hotly disputed West Bank territory. Haim Gitler has now identified the coin as a replica from a museum. more ]

Buckingham gold hoard

Around midday on Saturday 16 December 2006 two metal detectorists strolled onto a field near Buckingham and within a few minutes picked up a valuable gold coin that was lying on the surface. By the end of the weekend ... more ]

50 Years of Celtic Coin Index

Setting up an index of Celtic coins found in Britain was first thought of in 1959 by the archaeologist Professor Sheppard Frere and the numismatist Derek Allen. The growth of the CCI testifies to a commensurate increase in co-operation between professional archaeologists and amateur metal detectorists... more ]

Jersey – the Treasure Island of Celtic Coins

Jersey Post has just issued stamps featuring six iron age coins from a hoard found at Le Catillon, Jersey, in 1957. Celtic coin expert Chris Rudd reveals how it comes that Jersey may truly be called Treasure Island of iron age coins... more ]

Unique gold coin of Bodvoc found

On 16 April 2012 a 2000-year-old gold quarter stater of the ancient British ruler Bodvoc was discovered near Bristol. It was found by Dennis who has been metal detecting for 33 of his 53 years and it can rightly be described as ‘the find of a lifetime’ because of its numismatic importance. more ]

Introduction 'The People of Zurich and their Money' Part 1

Our series ‘The People of Zurich and their Money’ will present one exciting chapter of Swiss numismatics and economic history at a time. The introduction provides an initial overview in two parts. Follow along in this first section as we trace the evolution of Swiss numismatics from the beginning all the way through to the 16th century. more ]

The People of Zurich and their Money 1: The Celts’ First Contact with Greek Money

Our series ‘The People of Zurich and their Money’ takes you along for the ride as we explore the Zurich of times past. In this first chapter, we’ll be eavesdropping on a conversation from the 3rd century BC between a Celtic farmer and his wife. Much like a good DVD, this conversation comes with a sort of ‘making of’ – a little numismatic-historical backdrop to help underscore and illustrate this conversation. more ]

Was king of east Kent son of badger killer?

On 20 December 2012 an exceedingly rare gold coin of the Cantiaci tribe was found south of Canterbury in Kent. The coin is a gold quarter stater attributed to Sego, an elusive king who probably ruled in east Kent shortly after the birth of Christ. more ]

Unique coin of British king who fled to Germany

On 2 June 2013 a silver unit of a previously unrecorded type was found in east Kent, former land of the Cantiaci. It was struck by Amminus, a Cantian king who ruled in Kent around AD 30-40, shortly before the Claudian invasion in AD 43, which he may have encouraged. more ]

Another forger in north Hampshire?

On 5 August 2012 a late iron age coin punch was discovered by a metal detectorist near Andover, north Hampshire. Its function is unclear, it may be a trial or apprentice piece – or even an ancient forgery. more ]

Did a British king pay gold to Augustus?

The last series of gold staters issued by British ruler Tasciovanos poses a riddle to experts as the coins differ considerably from previous series. A possible explanation now suggests that the gold staters were made as tribute money to Augustus. more ]

Has Tom found Togodumnus?

Chris Rudd tells us how a newly discovered gold coin helps to reveal the possible identity of a long-forgotten British prince who died fighting during the Claudian invasion of AD 43. This coin was sold on January 13 for a record price of 10,200 Pounds. more ]

Rediscovery of Celtic gold in Brentonico

Helmut Rizzolli presents three Celtic gold coins which were found in Tyrol in the 19th century. A hundred years ago, a museum used them to pay off their heating bills, now they have reappeared on the collector’s market and can finally be analysed and interpreted. more ]

Unique dragon coin from Kent

On 20 February 2014 an ancient British silver coin of the highest rarity was unearthed by a metal detectorist near Canterbury in Kent. It was probably struck sometime around the birth of Christ by an obscure Cantian ruler. more ]

Celtic hammer-god found in Kent

Last year an exceedingly rare gold quarter stater, minted over 2,000 years ago in the Somme valley, northern France, was found near Ringwould, Kent, by a metal detectorist. Struck c.250-225 BC in the land of ... more ]

Killer’s gold to be sold

A rare gold stater of Tasciovanos, believed to be one of the finest known, will be auctioned in early May by Celtic dealer Chris Rudd...
more ]

Rare Gold "Diss" Torc fetches £50,700 at Auction

Spink / London sold a fine and rare gold Torc, from the Iron Age of Great Britain, for £50,700 at their auction in London...
more ]

A new Celtic coin book

“It is very easy to use, not just for people with Dr. in front of their name, but for everyone, from schoolkids to scholars.” more ]

52,000 coins found in Somerset in England

British detectorist found and reported one the biggest hoards found in Britain ever. Buried in a big jug approximately 30 cm underground were 52,000 antoniniani from the 3rd century A. D. ... more ]

Unique Celtic gold coin to be sold in May

Before this coin had been found, nobody knew about the British king Anarevitos... more ]

Celtic gold strong

A previously unrecorded gold stater of a hitherto unknown British king, Anarevitos, was recently auctioned by Chris Rudd for GBP 21,000. This is a record price for an Iron Age coin of Britain... more ]

The eye of God

A rare silver coin of the Iceni, struck in Norfolk over 2000 years ago, was recently found by a metal detectorist in East Anglia. It shows a man’s head with one eye blinded (or closed) and with another eye – a third eye, an open eye – in his mouth. Who is he? What is he doing? more ]

Moon-crowns of the Iceni

At Chris Rudd’s a rare silver coin of the Iceni tribe was auctioned for GBP 5,200 – the highest price ever paid for an ancient British silver coin! The motif on this coin, a moon-crown, is quite intriguing. Read here Chris Rudd’s explanation... more ]

New attribution of celtic coins: Caratacus instead of Cunobelinus

For 120 years a coin type has been wrongly attributed to King Cunobelinus because of a misreading of its inscription. A metal detectorist found another specimen, which permits now to attribute this coin to Cunobelinus’ son the famous freedom-fighter Caratacus... more ]

Wickham Market Gold Hoard to be Cleaned-up by Volunteers

At the moment, a gold hoard composed of 840 Iceni coins found in 2008 in a Suffolk field is cleaned by 50 volunteers. This is another example of British style cooperation... more ]

Artistic coins from Celtic culture

Those who love the drawings of Picasso should consider buying Celtic coins. They are nearly as modern as the great Spanish painter... more ]

Four rarities found

Four ancient British coins of the highest rarity have recently been unearthed by metal detectorists, confirming yet again the considerable contribution made by metal detecting to iron age numismatics. more ]

Largest treasure of Celtic coins ever found on Jersey

After thirty years of continuing search two amateur metal detectorists found a hoard of Celtic coins in the east of Jersey. The sensational finding weighs ca. three quarter of a tonne and thus comprises probably some 50,000 coins – the largest hoard of Celtic coins ever. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 3

Can you hazard a guess as to which European country is the most mountainous after Switzerland? Austria? Not a chance! It’s Spain. And besides being incredibly mountainous, Spain can also boast the best-preserved Roman city wall anywhere in the world. Join us on the third leg of our incredible trip as we make our way to the Picos de Europa and then to Lugo. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 1

Romans and Celts aren’t exactly what come to mind when you think of Northern Spain. I had basically expected this trip to be just a one-time foray into medieval times, with perhaps a few ancient bits thrown in for good measure. But I was completely off the mark – Northern Spain has so much more to offer. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain (2012)

In April 2012 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Northern Spain. During the summer she published her numismatic diary of this travel. Here you can read all single parts. more ]

Holy Grail from Lake Chiemsee

A cup made of pure gold and inspired by Celtic art has troubled the press for quite some time. A Swiss entrepreneur tried to gain one billion Euro from the ‘Holy Grail’ – and failed miserably. Now he has been condemned by a court. more ]

Cunobelin counterfeits

Chris Rudd’s Elizabeth Cottam, expert on Celtic coins, explains how to recognise counterfeits of coins of the Celtic king Cunobelin since the number of those apparently has significantly increased recently. more ]

Four rarities of a forgotten tribe

Celtic coin expert Chris Rudd will sell in auction four coins attributed to the obscure Belgae tribe, a tribe that has primarily become known again through numismatic testimonies thanks in particular to metal detectorists. more ]

Record price for a gold coin of a man who made a million

A gold stater of the Celtic king Cunobelin, known as the Biga Type, was recently sold for £15,100, the highest price ever paid for a coin of this ruler. more ]

A new exhibition in the Old Castle of Stuttgart

Roughly 80,000 years of the history of civilization are presented in the Landesmuseum Stuttgart since 2012 in its new permanent exhibition. A substantial part of it is in fact related to numismatics as we have noticed at our recent visit. more ]

Discovering the hidden treasures of Celts and Romans in Jersey

In 2012 two metal detectorists found the world’s largest hoard of Celtic coins in Jersey. The approximately 70,000 coins are now on display in Jersey’s museum and publicly cleaned in a glass fronted lab. more ]

Australian money man catalogues British boar money

The formerly chief financial officer of Reader’s Digest in Australia has written a pioneering book cataloguing the earliest silver coins of the Corieltavi, a large Iron Age tribe of the East Midlands. It has been published by Chris Rudd. more ]

A little more life for a tribe that died

March 2014 a small but exceedingly rare gold coin was found by a metal detectorist near Winchester, which will be sold on September 8, 2014. It shows two snakelike corded crescents on one side and a lanky belted horse on the other side. Only one other example is recorded. more ]

Solid gold Torc in Celtic coin hoard found

A new, exciting find has been discovered in Jersey’s Celtic coin hoard. The Jersey Heritage hoard conservation team uncovered one end of a solid gold torc, which is considerably larger than anything previously found. more ]

Studies in Ancient Coinage in Honour of Andrew Burnett

There can only be a handful of people who have increased our knowledge about Roman numismatics as greatly as Andrew Burnett. To honor him, his colleagues have now prepared a festschrift which, needless to say, focuses on minting in the entire area of Roman influence. more ]

COIN YEARBOOK 2016 released

Covering all British coins from the first Celtic issues to present-day currency, the latest volume of the best-selling coin price guide in the United Kingdom, the COIN YEARBOOK 2016, has been released. more ]

The Cheshire Hoards and the Romano-British North West

In 2012 and 2014 two hoards from the 1st and 2nd centuries AD were made in the English county of Cheshire. Museum of Liverpool is now organising a one-day conference on 27 February 2016 casting light on the findings and their historical and numismatic context. more ]

Hoarding Conference at the British Museum

A conference on ‘Hoarding and Deposition in Iron Age and Roman Britain, and Beyond’, will be taking place at the British Museum on Friday and Saturday 11th-12th March 2016, at the BP Lecture Theatre. The conference is free, but ticketed, so booking is essential. more ]

Hoards: the hidden history of ancient Britain

The British Museum shows a coins and medals display, ‘Hoards: the hidden history of ancient Britain’. Until 22 May 2016 this exhibition explores the stories behind the headlines focusing on prehistoric and Romano-British hoards from across the United Kingdom. more ]

The Coin Yearbook 2017

The latest volume of the Coin Yearbook has been released. It is a price guide and collector’s handbook for the coin hobby, with features which include accurate up-to-date valuations for all English, Scottish, Irish and Island (Channel & Isle of Man) coins. more ]

New Archaeological Discoveries Enlighten Britain’s Past

Portable Antiquities Scheme and Treasure annual reports announced the recording of a further 82,272 archaeological finds comprising 1,008 Treasure finds. PAS is now working closely with other European areas establishing a North Sea Area finds recording group. more ]

Boii and Taurisci

A new volume on the Celtic finds from Oberleiserberg, a Celtic settlement roughly 50 km north of Vienna, has been published. Among others, it contains interesting essays on numismatic topics. Ursula Kampmann took a look. more ]

COIN YEARBOOK app 2017 available

The first ever price guide to British coins in app form has now been released by TokenPublishing. Available on IOS and Android, the two editions address both the discerning collector and the specialized numismatist. more ]

The new MEC-volume on Britain and Ireland

Rory Naismith has published the newest MEC-volume on the coins of Britain and Ireland between ca. 400 and 1066. It is a “must” for every numismatic library, comparable only to the RIC or the Jaeger. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Taxes for Rome

Hands up anyone who hasn’t come to be annoyed by the tangled mass of regulations accompanying our tax collection. Perhaps at different times, the situation had been better… Perhaps in Rome? more ]

A temple for Honos

A coin of Trajan shows a temple for Honos in great detail. Honos? You don’t know this Roman deity? Join us and you will get to know her... more ]

The Puteal Scribonis

Most probably every collector of Roman Republican coins is aware of the pieces of Scribonius Libo showing the Puteal Scribonis. But hands up anyone who really knows what that is... more ]

The Son of Divine Caesar

Two rare aurei of the Gorny & Mosch sale from Augustus’ early years obtained impressive prices. Yet as intriguing as the two coins is the history of the man who minted them: Octavian better known as Augustus.
more ]

A fresh interpretation of the Portland Vase as depiction of the first wedding on earth

An ancient cameo vase has recently appeared on the market. It does not only captivate by its beauty. It resembles another famous object, the Portland Vase whose interpretation had been controversially debated for a long time. But a closer look at the “new finding” permits a deeper understanding of the Portland Vase as well. more ]

Macedonia becomes a province

A rare Macedonian tetradrachm, minted around 147 B. C., tells a story from the beginnings of the Roman province of Macedonia. The rarity is to be auctioned off in the upcoming Künker autumn auction sale to be conducted between the 7th and the 11th October 2013. more ]

Assassins of Caesar

Coins featuring the portrait of Brutus are extremely rare. Coin portraits of Cassius, even more so. Thus far, there is only one known coin type which probably depicts the staunch Republican. In the forthcoming Künker Fall Auction 280, you can come face to face with both assassins of Caesar. more ]

Brutus at the British Museum

On March 15, 2010 and right at the Ides of March, the British Museum exhibited a new coin: The aureus featuring the ... more ]

Rare Gold "Diss" Torc fetches £50,700 at Auction

Spink / London sold a fine and rare gold Torc, from the Iron Age of Great Britain, for £50,700 at their auction in London...
more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 2

Silifke, ancient Seleucia on the Calycadnus, is a small provincial town in the middle of nowhere nearby which once Frederick Barbarossa drowned. Follow us on our way to the ancient metropolis Antioch and into the marvellous grove of Daphne, that even today is in the modern Antiochenes’ favour as an important area for recreation. more ]

OCRE – A major new tool for Roman numismatics

The American Numismatic Society in collaboration with New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, has launched a major new tool to aid in the identification, research and cataloging of the coins of the ancient world: OCRE. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain (2012)

In April 2012 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Northern Spain. During the summer she published her numismatic diary of this travel. Here you can read all single parts. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009)

In the summer 2009 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Turkey – of course searching for numismatic traces as she always does. She condensed her impressions in a diary whose single parts we have gathered here. more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece (2011)

In summer 2011 Ursula Kampmann travelled Greece writing about her numismatic – and other – experiences a vivid diary. Here are all part gathered. more ]

Videos on Medieval and Roman numismatics

French numismatist Georges Depeyrot has uploaded onto his profile at Academia.edu two videos explaining the world of Roman coins and Medieval numismatics. more ]

Egypt and Alexandria. A brief numismatic survey

In this series Ursula Kampmann invites you to a trip though the history of Egypt and its capital Alexandria by its coinage. more ]

Human faces

Why was the human head the motif on coins for centuries, no, for millennia? And why did that change in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann is looking for answers to these questions in her book “Menschengesichter” (“Human faces”), from which the texts in this series are taken. more ]

The Thirty Years' War

Both religion and power were the focal points of the Thirty Years’ War that shook the whole of Europe during the 17th century. Ursula Kampmann brings that era alive. more ]

Exhibition in Fairfield, Connecticut: “Hair in the Classical World”

The Bellarmine Museum of Art at Fairfield University opened an exhibition on “Hair in the Classical World.” On display are objects and images from the Bronze Age through late Antiquity, including sculptures and, of course, coins. more ]

New ANS grant project on hoard analysis

HARP is the title of the latest grant project of the American Numismatic Society, aiming to create a tool that provides a global analysis of patterns of coinage circulation from Archaic to Byzantine times. more ]

ANS launches online catalogue with Egyptian National Library

The American Numismatic Society announced the digital publication of the non-hoard numismatic collection of the Egyptian National Library, in collaboration with the universities of Washington and Cairo. more ]

Museum of American Finance to Open Gold Exhibition

“Worth Its Weight” is the title of an exhibition that will be shown on Wall Street, New York, opening on November 19, 2015. Organized by the Museum of American Finance, it will feature more than 100 unique and rare gold objects. more ]

Maccabees and Seleucids as reflected in coins

It is never easy to write Jewish history. Too many emotions are involved. The Maccabean Revolt is no exception. By including the coins, David M. Jacobson arrives at a much more nuanced picture. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at his book. more ]

The Cheshire Hoards and the Romano-British North West

In 2012 and 2014 two hoards from the 1st and 2nd centuries AD were made in the English county of Cheshire. Museum of Liverpool is now organising a one-day conference on 27 February 2016 casting light on the findings and their historical and numismatic context. more ]

Hoarding Conference at the British Museum

A conference on ‘Hoarding and Deposition in Iron Age and Roman Britain, and Beyond’, will be taking place at the British Museum on Friday and Saturday 11th-12th March 2016, at the BP Lecture Theatre. The conference is free, but ticketed, so booking is essential. more ]

Hoards: the hidden history of ancient Britain

The British Museum shows a coins and medals display, ‘Hoards: the hidden history of ancient Britain’. Until 22 May 2016 this exhibition explores the stories behind the headlines focusing on prehistoric and Romano-British hoards from across the United Kingdom. more ]

British Museum presents an exhibition on 4000 years of Sicilian art

The British Museum shows the impressive exhibition ‘Sicily: culture and conquest’. Over 4000 years of history on the island are explored through objects in the museum’s own collection alongside outstanding loans from Sicily and around the world. more ]

Pergamon and the Hellenistic Kingdoms of the Ancient World

The New York Met is showing the exhibition “Pergamon and the Hellenistic Kingdoms of the Ancient World” featuring many important loans from abroad particularly from the Pergamon Museum Berlin. Among the objects there are also coins from the ANS. more ]

“It could not be imagined in a more magnificent way!”

This is how the title translates under which the Festschrift for the 65th birthday of Dieter Salzmann was published and when holding these two comprehensive volumes in your hands, one can only agree to the title. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the Festschrift. more ]

Exhibition review: ‘Minted: Making Money and Meaning’

The Grosvenor Museum in Chester (UK) made extensive use of photography in an exhibition of 2016. Professional photos were taken of members of the public who had had their hair styled to emulate various portraits on coins. Henry Flynn reports. more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Words and Coins

A completely different exhibition concept was the basis of a 2012 exhibition held in Cologny, a suburb of Geneva, the catalog of which we present here. It focused on words and images, on books and coins. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the catalog. more ]

New research on Roman Republican coinage

Between June 19 and 21, 2014, a research colloquium on Roman Republican coinage was held in Dresden. Central research topic was the importance of die axis for determining the mint location. Ursula Kampmann reviews the publication. more ]

ANS provides online image-zooming feature

The American Numismatic Society will make its highest-resolution images available. With 160,000 numismatic objects photographed thus far, this will enable researchers to zoom down into minute details, in order to assist them in their work. more ]

A donative of Constantine the Great

This impressive piece belongs to a small series of silver medallions celebrating the vicennalia of Constantine II, the eldest surviving son of Constantine the Great, in 336. more ]

The First Marcomannic War of Marcus Aurelius

In the middle of the 2nd century AD the tribe of the Goths left its native homeland. The tribesmen moved southwards and expelled other people from their homes who in their turn tried to find new land further south. One of these tribes were the Marcomanni. more ]

Honni soit qui mal y pense or What exactly was the spintriae’s function?

One has to pay high prices indeed for the so-called spintriae – brothel tokens as one is secretly whispered to. There are experts who know exactly what the function of these objects was... more ]

The unlucky emperor Clodius Albinus – a portrait study

What a huge surprise when the company Gorny & Mosch – Giessener Münzhandlung auctioned off a Roman portrait head from the late 2nd cent. A. D. at auction sale 184 on December 18th, 2009. It was a high quality marble portrait in a remarkable state of preservation which some ... more ]

Drusus and Sejanus – Roman Rules of Succession to the throne

At the death of Augustus the Roman polity was not a hereditary monarchy. The power over the Romans was not transferred automatically ... more ]

Creator of the Paduans: Giovanni da Cavino

Giovanni da Cavino was an exceptionally gifted artist and an honoured businessman when he imitated the first Roman coins. As ‘Paduans’, they were destined to achieve world fame later on. He provided the high society with what it looked for and earned good money with it. In those days, nobody would have dreamt co call him a forger... more ]

A fan of Alexander the Great

Many Roman politicians adored the conquerer of the world, Alexander the Great. The emperor Caracalla was no exception... more ]

The sacrilege of Tarpeia – or propaganda under Augustus

Augustus’ reign went down in history as a Golden Age even though hardly any other emperor had more lives on his conscience. How did the “Prince of Peace” who continuously fought wars make his citizens believe that they lived in the happiest of all worlds? more ]

The sacred year of the Pagans – the Saecular Games

When the Pope declares a jubilee year, he stands in a tradition which is almost as old as Christianity itself. It was Augustus who created the practice of absolving mankind when nobody was still alive of those who had witnessed the beginning of the previous saeculum... more ]

Taxes for Rome

Hands up anyone who hasn’t come to be annoyed by the tangled mass of regulations accompanying our tax collection. Perhaps at different times, the situation had been better… Perhaps in Rome? more ]

A temple for Honos

A coin of Trajan shows a temple for Honos in great detail. Honos? You don’t know this Roman deity? Join us and you will get to know her... more ]

Pilgrim’s Ring and Coin of the Jewish War

This is the story of a ring, bought from an Arab in Jerusalem, the feasts of Shavout and Sukkot and a coin of the Jewish War... more ]

Alexander of Abonuteichos – a lesson from Asia Minor about gullibility in the 2nd cent. A. D.

You are one of those people who believe than there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy? Well, you are in accordance with a deep-seated tradition and can appeal to the fact that already in antiquity there were people who thought the same as you. .. more ]

Magnus Maximus or the Last Romans in Britain

Around 400 AD the Roman Empire was shaken to the core. Britain’s governor claimed himself Roman Emperor, but found his only long-lasting success in the Welsh mythology.
By examining 12 coins we are going to stroll through Great Britain’s history – this is part 1... more ]

The temple of Zeus Hypsistos on Mount Gerizim near Neapolis

Present-day Nablus in Palestine had an intriguing history in antiquity. On near-by Mount Gerizim an old sanctuary of the Samaritans was situated which the Greeks and Romans re-interpreted and dedicated to Zeus. Only coins bear witness of the former significance of the temple. more ]

In the emperor’s service – the legions

Do you sometimes dream of visiting the epoch when Roman legions dominated the world, in the same way as the time traveller of H. G. Wells? Of course it is impossible, but modern re-enactment gives you quite a good idea of what the soldiers once accomplished. more ]

The Son of Divine Caesar

Two rare aurei of the Gorny & Mosch sale from Augustus’ early years obtained impressive prices. Yet as intriguing as the two coins is the history of the man who minted them: Octavian better known as Augustus.
more ]

A fresh interpretation of the Portland Vase as depiction of the first wedding on earth

An ancient cameo vase has recently appeared on the market. It does not only captivate by its beauty. It resembles another famous object, the Portland Vase whose interpretation had been controversially debated for a long time. But a closer look at the “new finding” permits a deeper understanding of the Portland Vase as well. more ]

Great is Artemis of the Ephesians

On his visit to Ephesus, St. Paul was in imminent danger to be lynched. Why was it that the Ephesians felt so threatened by this herald of a new god? Were they more pious than other Greeks? They were, in a way, since they lived on their religion… more ]

Shipping and superstition in antiquity

Sailors faced many dangers. But the superstitious people found a way to deal with that, and many deities and animals assisted the humans on the sea. A coin from Kyzikos tells of all this, a coin minted on the visit of Emperor Marcus Aurelius. more ]

“Sing, Muse, of the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles…”

You believe that Paris abducted Helena? Which was why the Greek destroyed Troy? What if it was completely different? The later Trojans in Roman Imperial Times adhered to an entirely different version of the story – and so they celebrated their hero Hector on their coins. more ]

Bread for Tarsus

In the 3th cent., Asia Minor was famine-stricken. The city of Tarsus scored a coup that made the emperor leave the grain necessary for survival to it at a cheap rate. A coin tells of how that was achieved. more ]

Introduction 'The People of Zurich and their Money' Part 1

Our series ‘The People of Zurich and their Money’ will present one exciting chapter of Swiss numismatics and economic history at a time. The introduction provides an initial overview in two parts. Follow along in this first section as we trace the evolution of Swiss numismatics from the beginning all the way through to the 16th century. more ]

The People of Zurich and Their Money 2: The Customs Station of Turicum

Our series takes you along for the ride as we explore the Zurich of times past. This time, you’ll get a chance to read about two men chatting with one another at the customs station of Turicum at the end of the 2nd century AD. Much like a good DVD, this conversation comes with a sort of ‘making of’ – a little numismatic-historical backdrop to help underscore and illustrate this conversation. more ]

Gods Unto Themselves? Augustus and Caligula

The image of the Temple of Augustus on the sestertii of Caligula is among the most beautiful architectural motifs found on Roman coins. In its upcoming auction, Numismatica Genevensis is offering the finest known specimen of this fascinating issue. more ]

The ‘Modest Aphrodite’ from Nysa-Scythopolis (Beth Shean) and Ptolemais (Akko)

A comparison between a statue of Aphrodite found at Beth Shean and a coin type from the mint of Ptolemais reminds us of the realistic nature of statues appearing on city coins. more ]

The usurper Proculus and his coinage

Umberto Moruzzi and Fabio Scatolini will tell you the story of the Roman usurper Proculus of whom we have only two coins left. Both items were hotly discussed and if you want to learn about the coins’ authenticity and 15 century fantasy coins, read this article. more ]

Sestos and Abydos, Hero and Leander: a Love Story in Coinage

Through the images on their coins ancient cities reflected on what they believed to constitute their identity. For that purpose two cities situated on the Hellespont strait in Asia Minor chose a moving love story with a tragic ending. more ]

TRAIANUS – OPTIMUS PRINCEPS, DACICVS

In A. D. 107, Rome was celebrating a huge triumph. Emperor Trajan had returned from his successful campaign against the Dacians. Not only coins recall his victory but likewise a tiny emission of rare medallions one of which will be auctioned off as part of sale #224 of Gorny & Mosch to be conducted on 13 October, 2014. more ]

Documenting the Past: an Ancient Industry recorded in Coinage

An unusual coin type recently sold for 30,000 GBP at the London-based Ceres Auction House depicts an ancient industry, hitherto unrecorded on coinage or sculptural reliefs: the production of noodles. more ]

Roman Coins from the Mint of Milan

In Auction 43 of Münzen and Medaillen GmbH a collection of Roman imperial coins minted in Milan will be on offer (Lots 460-529). Here you will learn more about the issues of this mint. more ]

Postumus – The creator of the Gallic Empire

Alemanni, Juthungi, Franks, and Sassanians attack the Roman world. Postumus seizes the moment and establishes the Gallic Empire. We will tell the story of his coins on the basis of a comprehensive special collection which will be sold at the upcoming Jacquier Auction. more ]

Coins of Lucilla ‘born to the purple’

Lucilla Augusta was very special at her time: not only was she the daughter of emperor Marcus Aurelius, but at the same time she was his co-emperor’s wife. Claire Franklin illustrates by Lucilla’s coin designs how she lived her role. more ]

Globalisation in Roman times: Trade with India

In the upcoming auction of Künker on 13 March 2017, several interesting aurei are going to be put to auction. They are Indian imitations of Roman gold coins, which bespeak the close trade relations between Rome and the Indian subcontinent. more ]

Emperors bearing Gifts

June 9, 2017, Münzen und Medaillen GmbH will auction off the Markus Weder collection at Weil am Rhein featuring some extremely rare miliarense. Claire Franklin will tell us the story of these coins. more ]

A new type for an antoninianus of Postumus

In Jacquier sale 43, to be held on September 15, 2017, a hitherto unknown and unique antoninianus of Postumus will be offered. Both its date and its historical context can be pinpointed due to its special bust. more ]

Nine months and 13 days: the reign of Galba

In its Auction 333 to be held on November 30, 2017, the long-standing auction house Hess-Divo offers a particularly remarkable special collection, the Galba Collection. It is dedicated to the Roman Emperor Galba, as the first emperor who no longer stemmed from the Julio-Claudian dynasty. We tell his story through some of the rarities stemming from this collection. more ]

52,000 coins found in Somerset in England

British detectorist found and reported one the biggest hoards found in Britain ever. Buried in a big jug approximately 30 cm underground were 52,000 antoniniani from the 3rd century A. D. ... more ]

Frome Hoard remains where it was found!

The Museum of Somerset raised 320,250 Pounds in order to preserve the biggest Roman hoard ever found in one pot in Britain for its visitors... more ]

Roman Piggybank underneath modern barracks

During an archaeological routine research connected with a reconstruction project 1.247 extremely nice preserved antoniniani were found in a pot at British Colchester... more ]

A treasure find on paper and its legal bedlam

French claims for gold coins from the time of the barrack emperors originating from the so-called hoard of Lava have feet of clay. Please find here a recent verdict, which was delivered by the administrative court of Osnabrück. more ]

Roman criminals detected by award winning amateur archaeologist

The Searcher acknowledged it to be the ‘most significant hoard’ in the Nations’ Greatest Find competition: a couple of blank bronze coins and an anvil. According to experts these objects were forgers’ equipment from around 300 AD... more ]

Two detectorists’ treasure trove rewrites the Roman History of Britain

Due to a treasure trove of ca. 100 Roman coins further investigations have been made. They unveiled a Roman settlement in a region, of which archaeology has thought until now, that it was never colonized by the Romans... more ]

‘Wailing Wall’ built after Herod

Archaeological excavations permit a new view on one of the most contentious religious places of the whole world, the Jerusalem Temple Mount. Until now it was believed to be erected by King Herod. Coins point to a later completion... more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 1

It’s grey, it’s cold, it’s dark. Sometimes you don’t believe that it’s ever going to be light again. Enjoy a little breeze of the Turkish summer in the dead of winter. This diary of some numismatically highly interesting but barely visited sites in Turkey was written in 2009. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 2

Silifke, ancient Seleucia on the Calycadnus, is a small provincial town in the middle of nowhere nearby which once Frederick Barbarossa drowned. Follow us on our way to the ancient metropolis Antioch and into the marvellous grove of Daphne, that even today is in the modern Antiochenes’ favour as an important area for recreation. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 3

Do you know Antep and its fabulous museum with mosaics? If not, I strongly recommend it to you. Antep is a pleasant town where you quickly feel at home. Urfa, ancient Edessa, in contrast, can’t be recommended for women traveling on their own. And if you do, you will need steady nerves. more ]

Roman Imperial Coinage AD 268-276 goes online

As a preliminary step to the printed revision of the Roman Imperial Coinage V.1, part 2 a new website has gone online. The database presented there applies to the imperial reigns from AD 268 until 276 and is searchable and contains more than 4,500 entries. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 4

Only a few images stick to your mind so powerfully as the huge heads of the broken monumental statues of Nemrut Dag. During our trip there, however, we have seen many other things: marvelous rocky landscapes, a magnificent bridge from Roman Times and lots of friendly people. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 5

Caesarea Cappadocia – only few cities in the Roman provinces possessed an equally comprehensive coinage yet barely anything Roman is still extant in the city. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 7

You don’t have to introduce Istanbul. Everyone knows the beautiful city at Bosporus River. This was our last stop on our journey across Turkey. After having been to areas with barely any touristic infrastructure it was almost a civilization shock to finally get anything again a tourist would wish. more ]

Sensation in Völs: Roman balance with Bacchus

The Austrian museums are proposing 100 objects in a large-scale publicity campaign. Now and then the selection comprises even an object that might fascinate those interested in economical and monetary history like this reconstruction of a Roman balance. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 1

Romans and Celts aren’t exactly what come to mind when you think of Northern Spain. I had basically expected this trip to be just a one-time foray into medieval times, with perhaps a few ancient bits thrown in for good measure. But I was completely off the mark – Northern Spain has so much more to offer. more ]

Numismatics in Jerusalem – Part 1

Actually, numismatics concentrates on quite a narrow space in Jerusalem. There is the Israel Museum, which accommodates beside its own collection the Israel Antiquities Authority as well. And only a fifteen minutes’ walk from there you will find the exhibition of the Bank of Israel. Follow us today to a visit at the Israel Museum. more ]

OCRE – A major new tool for Roman numismatics

The American Numismatic Society in collaboration with New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, has launched a major new tool to aid in the identification, research and cataloging of the coins of the ancient world: OCRE. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 3

Can you hazard a guess as to which European country is the most mountainous after Switzerland? Austria? Not a chance! It’s Spain. And besides being incredibly mountainous, Spain can also boast the best-preserved Roman city wall anywhere in the world. Join us on the third leg of our incredible trip as we make our way to the Picos de Europa and then to Lugo. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain (2012)

In April 2012 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Northern Spain. During the summer she published her numismatic diary of this travel. Here you can read all single parts. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009)

In the summer 2009 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Turkey – of course searching for numismatic traces as she always does. She condensed her impressions in a diary whose single parts we have gathered here. more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece (2011)

In summer 2011 Ursula Kampmann travelled Greece writing about her numismatic – and other – experiences a vivid diary. Here are all part gathered. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 6

You’ve probably never heard of Las Médulas. And yet, this site of the most important gold mines of the Roman Empire is now a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. The landscape of Las Médulas is staggeringly beautiful, so much so that we were distracted to the point of nearly getting completely lost. more ]

The Romans in Saarland

You don’t have necessarily to go far away if you want to learn about the Romans. Did you know that the only completely reconstructed Roman Imperial villa is located in Germany, more precisely in Saarland? Follow us on our tour through a Roman high-end home. more ]

Second antoninianus of Roman Emperor Proculus found

In the 1990s a unique coin came up, a silver coin of Proculus, a Roman third century usurper. Now metal detectorists found a second specimen in England. Discussion is arousing again: genuine or Renaissance forgery? more ]

Important gold coin hoard in the UK

A metal detectorist led to what turned out to be one of the largest Roman gold coin hoards ever found in the UK. 159 gold coins from late fourth century CE were found in Hertfordshire and are now being analysed. more ]

French National Library puts 130,000 coins online

The French National Library is making available 130,000 Greek and Roman provincial coins in an online database. This monumental project is expected to be concluded by the end of 2013, but numerous coins are searchable already. more ]

Beau Street Hoard being questioned about its secrets

In 2007 an archaeological excavation in the city of Bath revealed an enormous hoard of Roman coins. The content of seven of the eight bags full of coins has been counted. Currently the coins are being analysed and described. The British Museum presents this work in its blog. more ]

The British Museum and the University of Leicester announce £645K to study Roman hoards found in Britain

The Arts and Humanities Research Council has awarded the British Museum, working in collaboration with the University of Leicester, a £645K grant for a 3-year project on “Crisis or continuity? The deposition of metalwork in the Roman world: what do coin hoards tell us about Roman Britain in the 3rd century AD?” more ]

Videos on Medieval and Roman numismatics

French numismatist Georges Depeyrot has uploaded onto his profile at Academia.edu two videos explaining the world of Roman coins and Medieval numismatics. more ]

Egypt and Alexandria. A brief numismatic survey

In this series Ursula Kampmann invites you to a trip though the history of Egypt and its capital Alexandria by its coinage. more ]

Human faces

Why was the human head the motif on coins for centuries, no, for millennia? And why did that change in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann is looking for answers to these questions in her book “Menschengesichter” (“Human faces”), from which the texts in this series are taken. more ]

The Thirty Years' War

Both religion and power were the focal points of the Thirty Years’ War that shook the whole of Europe during the 17th century. Ursula Kampmann brings that era alive. more ]

Elite and Coinage in Asia Minor

A coinage more lavishly illustrated and more colorful than the one of Asia Minor in Roman Imperial times is hard to imagine. Responsible was a wealthy elite which expressed its perceptions on coins. Robert Bennett has dealt with this topic, and Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at his book. more ]

Roman coin trove found in Swiss cherry orchard

A farmer discovered one of the biggest coin troves in Switzerland in Ueken near Frick by pure chance. Exceptionally well preserved, the more than 4,000 coins from Roman Times must have been withdrawn from circulation shortly after being struck and buried in the ground. more ]

Studies in Ancient Coinage in Honour of Andrew Burnett

There can only be a handful of people who have increased our knowledge about Roman numismatics as greatly as Andrew Burnett. To honor him, his colleagues have now prepared a festschrift which, needless to say, focuses on minting in the entire area of Roman influence. more ]

Long awaited, finally released: the new RPC

Is there anybody really in need of an explanation why he has to buy the new RPC? Ursula Kampmann provides this explanation. After all, this comprehensive catalog of Roman provincial coinage is an absolute must-have for any ambitious library. more ]

British Museum presents major Egypt exhibition

Under the title “Egypt: faith after the pharaohs”, the British Museum presents a fascinating exhibition until February 7, 2016. Dealing with 1,200 years of Egyptian history, it provides unparalleled insight into the lives of different religious communities. more ]

Exhibition in Fairfield, Connecticut: “Hair in the Classical World”

The Bellarmine Museum of Art at Fairfield University opened an exhibition on “Hair in the Classical World.” On display are objects and images from the Bronze Age through late Antiquity, including sculptures and, of course, coins. more ]

New ANS grant project on hoard analysis

HARP is the title of the latest grant project of the American Numismatic Society, aiming to create a tool that provides a global analysis of patterns of coinage circulation from Archaic to Byzantine times. more ]

ANS launches online catalogue with Egyptian National Library

The American Numismatic Society announced the digital publication of the non-hoard numismatic collection of the Egyptian National Library, in collaboration with the universities of Washington and Cairo. more ]

Museum of American Finance to Open Gold Exhibition

“Worth Its Weight” is the title of an exhibition that will be shown on Wall Street, New York, opening on November 19, 2015. Organized by the Museum of American Finance, it will feature more than 100 unique and rare gold objects. more ]

COIN YEARBOOK 2016 released

Covering all British coins from the first Celtic issues to present-day currency, the latest volume of the best-selling coin price guide in the United Kingdom, the COIN YEARBOOK 2016, has been released. more ]

Bronze Portraits of the Emperor Hadrian in Jerusalem

Three extant bronze portraits of Emperor Hadrian are brought together for a first-time display in Jerusalem’s Israel Museum featuring loans from the British Museum and the Louvre. The exhibition concludes the Israel Museum’s celebrations of its 50th anniversary. more ]

The funny side of numismatics: book recommendations for the boxing week

Well, did you find the wrong book under the Christmas tree, again? Then there is only one thing to do, hurry to the computer and order an entertaining, numismatically tinged book yourself. Ursula Kampmann has compiled some books tips (also for listening). more ]

The Cheshire Hoards and the Romano-British North West

In 2012 and 2014 two hoards from the 1st and 2nd centuries AD were made in the English county of Cheshire. Museum of Liverpool is now organising a one-day conference on 27 February 2016 casting light on the findings and their historical and numismatic context. more ]

Crowdsourced Coin-Identification Project Completed in Record Time

In December 2015 the American Numismatic Society and British Museum’s Portable Antiquity Scheme have concluded in record time a crowdsourced coin identification project thanks to the help of many volunteers. more ]

Roman coin hoard disunites British metal detectorists

The question of who is the true finder of a Roman coin hoard in Lymington, UK, currently keeps officials busy. The case illustrates the rules of etiquette of private metal detectorists. more ]

Pompeii’s end reconstructed in stereoscope

In 2009 Melbourne Museum showed an exhibition on Pompeii’s end. Highlight was a stereoscopic film in an immersive 3D theatre installation. Visitors saw there the reconstruction of the city’s last hours. A nightmarish scenario. more ]

Hoarding Conference at the British Museum

A conference on ‘Hoarding and Deposition in Iron Age and Roman Britain, and Beyond’, will be taking place at the British Museum on Friday and Saturday 11th-12th March 2016, at the BP Lecture Theatre. The conference is free, but ticketed, so booking is essential. more ]

Hoards: the hidden history of ancient Britain

The British Museum shows a coins and medals display, ‘Hoards: the hidden history of ancient Britain’. Until 22 May 2016 this exhibition explores the stories behind the headlines focusing on prehistoric and Romano-British hoards from across the United Kingdom. more ]

British Museum presents an exhibition on 4000 years of Sicilian art

The British Museum shows the impressive exhibition ‘Sicily: culture and conquest’. Over 4000 years of history on the island are explored through objects in the museum’s own collection alongside outstanding loans from Sicily and around the world. more ]

600kg of Roman coins found in amphorae

In Tomares in southern Spain, construction workers have found nearly 600 kg of coins. Dating to the Tetrarchic era, the folles were stored in 19 amphorae and then buried in the ground. more ]

Hiker Found an Extremely Rare Aureus of Trajan

In Israel, a hiker found an extremely rare aureus minted by Emperor Trajan. It was turned over to the Israel Antiquities Authority. more ]

A Portrait of Antinous, in Two Parts

The Art Institute of Chicago shows two portraits of Antinous, the favorite of Roman Emperor Hadrian. Together with that masterpiece other items like coins on loan from the ANS try to cast a light on the historical figure. The display runs through August 28, 2016. more ]

“The Emperor’s Gold” at Kunsthistorisches Museums Vienna

As part of the 125th anniversary celebrations of the Kunsthistorisches Museum the Coin Cabinet is showing a special exhibition running until 5 March 2017 featuring selected gold coins from the Emperor’s coin collection. more ]

Roman coins discovered in Japanese castle ruin

The numismatic world is stunned by sensational news from faraway Japan. Coins from the time of Constantine the Great have been found in the province of Okinawa. But how did the copper coins get into Katsuren Castle, which was only built in the 12th century? more ]

Digital mediation on Gallica.fr

Digital mediation on Gallica.fr is making the Bibliothèque nationale de France’s Coin department’s collections more accessible. Julien Olivier presents the development of thematic itineraries through the Greek and Roman coins collections. more ]

Defacing the past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome

The British Museum shows ‘Defacing the past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome’ presenting coins and other objects that were defaced, either to condemn the memory of deceased Roman emperors or to contest the power of living ones. more ]

“It could not be imagined in a more magnificent way!”

This is how the title translates under which the Festschrift for the 65th birthday of Dieter Salzmann was published and when holding these two comprehensive volumes in your hands, one can only agree to the title. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the Festschrift. more ]

Game over for the Ephesus excavation?

After more than 120 years, the Austrian Archaeological Institute has lost its excavating licence. The Turkish government thus strikes back against Austrian attitudes towards Turkey. more ]

Archaeologists discover gold coins in Pompeii

In Pompeii four skeletons have been found that were accompanied by gold coins. The human remains have been discovered in the ruins of an ancient shop on the outskirts of the city. more ]

York’s Forgotten Emperor at Yorkshire Museum

Constantius Spotlight Exhibition featuring Beaurains Hoard to open at Yorkshire Museum. The exhibition reveals the story of Constantius Chlorus (250-306 AD) who made his name in Britain, defeating rebellious generals and fighting Picts north of Hadrian’s Wall. more ]

Getty shows ‘Roman Mosaics across the Empire’

Roman Mosaics across the Empire, on view until January 1, 2018, at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa, presents the artistry of mosaics as well as the contexts of their discovery throughout the Mediterranean region. more ]

Welcome to Iran! Part 11: Persepolis! At last!

If ever there was a reason why I wanted to travel Iran, it was Persepolis, the capital of the Persians with its incredible Apadana. Finally the day has come. We are going to see the city of cities! more ]

Exhibition review: ‘Minted: Making Money and Meaning’

The Grosvenor Museum in Chester (UK) made extensive use of photography in an exhibition of 2016. Professional photos were taken of members of the public who had had their hair styled to emulate various portraits on coins. Henry Flynn reports. more ]

Yorkshire Museum acquires Wold Newton Hoard

The largest Tetrarchic hoard ever discovered in the North of England will stay in the Yorkshire Museum thanks to generous donations. Currently the coins are treated for conservation but will be revealed soon. Andrew Woods reports. more ]

500 years of Roman portrait art

Andreas Pangerl has initiated a book that constitutes a bibliophile declaration of love to the artworks of Roman mint masters. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at the illustrated book and its articles on Roman portrait art. more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

The coinage of Ephesus

The coinage of Ephesus from Roman Imperial times is central to the understanding of provincial numismatics. Stefan Karwiese has been working on it for many years. Now, he presents a commentary volume to his controversial catalog. Ursula Kampmann took a look. more ]

American Numismatic Society Launches Image-Based Roman Coin Identification

The American Numismatic Society presents a new interface for Online Coins of the Roman Empire, which allows non-specialists, hobbyists, collectors, archaeologists, and others to browse Roman Imperial coins by image for free online. more ]

Words and Coins

A completely different exhibition concept was the basis of a 2012 exhibition held in Cologny, a suburb of Geneva, the catalog of which we present here. It focused on words and images, on books and coins. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the catalog. more ]

COIN YEARBOOK app 2017 available

The first ever price guide to British coins in app form has now been released by TokenPublishing. Available on IOS and Android, the two editions address both the discerning collector and the specialized numismatist. more ]

“Faces of Power” – Exhibition in Jerusalem

The Israel Museum shows ‘Faces of Power. Roman Gold Coins from the Victor A. Adda Collection until June 2018. Haim Gitler describes the exhibition and the story of arguably “one of the century’s major collections of Roman gold coins”. more ]

Seaton Down Hoard on display in Exeter

The Seaton Down Hoard has arrived at the Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery, Exeter. With 22,888 Roman coins, it is by far the largest coin hoard found in Devon and the third largest ever found in Britain. more ]

ANS provides online image-zooming feature

The American Numismatic Society will make its highest-resolution images available. With 160,000 numismatic objects photographed thus far, this will enable researchers to zoom down into minute details, in order to assist them in their work. more ]

Helena, the First Christian Pilgrim

Inspired by a visit of the church of Santa Croce. David Hendin recalls to us the story of Helena, mother of Constantine, a "rags to riches" story, which ends with the first Christian pilgrim establishing the tradition of pilgrimage to the Holy Land and bringing to Rome pieces of the True Cross... more ]

A Struggle for Rome

During the auction week from October 8th-12th, Künker will be putting a rare solidus of Theodoric the Great up for auction. The piece, minted in Rome in the name of Emperor Anastasius I, presents a good opportunity to retell the history behind the coin. more ]

Emperors bearing Gifts

June 9, 2017, Münzen und Medaillen GmbH will auction off the Markus Weder collection at Weil am Rhein featuring some extremely rare miliarense. Claire Franklin will tell us the story of these coins. more ]

Large Coin Hoard Found In Shropshire

In August a novice metal detector user reported his first find: the largest coin hoard ever found in Shropshire county. Over 9,000 Roman coins from the 4th century AD may have been buried as ritual offering. HM Coroner declared the finding treasure... more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 2

Silifke, ancient Seleucia on the Calycadnus, is a small provincial town in the middle of nowhere nearby which once Frederick Barbarossa drowned. Follow us on our way to the ancient metropolis Antioch and into the marvellous grove of Daphne, that even today is in the modern Antiochenes’ favour as an important area for recreation. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009) – Part 7

You don’t have to introduce Istanbul. Everyone knows the beautiful city at Bosporus River. This was our last stop on our journey across Turkey. After having been to areas with barely any touristic infrastructure it was almost a civilization shock to finally get anything again a tourist would wish. more ]

OCRE – A major new tool for Roman numismatics

The American Numismatic Society in collaboration with New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, has launched a major new tool to aid in the identification, research and cataloging of the coins of the ancient world: OCRE. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain (2012)

In April 2012 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Northern Spain. During the summer she published her numismatic diary of this travel. Here you can read all single parts. more ]

Diary of a numismatist travelling Turkey (2009)

In the summer 2009 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Turkey – of course searching for numismatic traces as she always does. She condensed her impressions in a diary whose single parts we have gathered here. more ]

Numismatic diary of a journey throughout Greece (2011)

In summer 2011 Ursula Kampmann travelled Greece writing about her numismatic – and other – experiences a vivid diary. Here are all part gathered. more ]

The coinage of Maxentius

Maxentius ruled between 306 and 312, as the last emperor who had a residence in Rome. His comprehensive coinage makes ample reference to the great past of the Eternal City. Now, a corpus of his coinage has been published which Ursula Kampmann introduces you to here. more ]

Egypt and Alexandria. A brief numismatic survey

In this series Ursula Kampmann invites you to a trip though the history of Egypt and its capital Alexandria by its coinage. more ]

Exhibition in Fairfield, Connecticut: “Hair in the Classical World”

The Bellarmine Museum of Art at Fairfield University opened an exhibition on “Hair in the Classical World.” On display are objects and images from the Bronze Age through late Antiquity, including sculptures and, of course, coins. more ]

New ANS grant project on hoard analysis

HARP is the title of the latest grant project of the American Numismatic Society, aiming to create a tool that provides a global analysis of patterns of coinage circulation from Archaic to Byzantine times. more ]

ANS launches online catalogue with Egyptian National Library

The American Numismatic Society announced the digital publication of the non-hoard numismatic collection of the Egyptian National Library, in collaboration with the universities of Washington and Cairo. more ]

COIN YEARBOOK 2016 released

Covering all British coins from the first Celtic issues to present-day currency, the latest volume of the best-selling coin price guide in the United Kingdom, the COIN YEARBOOK 2016, has been released. more ]

British Museum presents an exhibition on 4000 years of Sicilian art

The British Museum shows the impressive exhibition ‘Sicily: culture and conquest’. Over 4000 years of history on the island are explored through objects in the museum’s own collection alongside outstanding loans from Sicily and around the world. more ]

Money in Ancient Rome

Republic, Senate, Dictator, we all know what these terms do mean. And we tend to transfer the modern interpretation to Ancient Rome. Nevertheless, then politics was completely different. What it did look like, you will learn in this PDF slideshow series. more ]

Coin Hoard Dates the End of the City Center of Ephesos

Austrian archaeologists recovered a coin hoard in Ephesos which dates exactly when the administrative centre of Ephesos lost its purpose. more ]

Game over for the Ephesus excavation?

After more than 120 years, the Austrian Archaeological Institute has lost its excavating licence. The Turkish government thus strikes back against Austrian attitudes towards Turkey. more ]

Welcome to Iran! Part 11: Persepolis! At last!

If ever there was a reason why I wanted to travel Iran, it was Persepolis, the capital of the Persians with its incredible Apadana. Finally the day has come. We are going to see the city of cities! more ]

Yorkshire Museum acquires Wold Newton Hoard

The largest Tetrarchic hoard ever discovered in the North of England will stay in the Yorkshire Museum thanks to generous donations. Currently the coins are treated for conservation but will be revealed soon. Andrew Woods reports. more ]

500 years of Roman portrait art

Andreas Pangerl has initiated a book that constitutes a bibliophile declaration of love to the artworks of Roman mint masters. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at the illustrated book and its articles on Roman portrait art. more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

International Symposium “Byzantine Gold Coins in the World of Late Antiquity”

In Changchun (China) an International Symposium on “Byzantine Gold Coins in the World of Late Antiquity” will take place from 23 to 25 June 2017. Central questions deal with globalisation and cultural exchange between East and West. more ]

Spectacular solidi hoard found in the Netherlands

41 Roman solidi have been discovered in an orchard in the Gelderland province. They may have served to pay a local ruler to assist in the fight against Germanic tribes. This is a promising start for a newly established project that aims at recording private archaeological finds. more ]

Words and Coins

A completely different exhibition concept was the basis of a 2012 exhibition held in Cologny, a suburb of Geneva, the catalog of which we present here. It focused on words and images, on books and coins. Ursula Kampmann took a look at the catalog. more ]

COIN YEARBOOK app 2017 available

The first ever price guide to British coins in app form has now been released by TokenPublishing. Available on IOS and Android, the two editions address both the discerning collector and the specialized numismatist. more ]

“Faces of Power” – Exhibition in Jerusalem

The Israel Museum shows ‘Faces of Power. Roman Gold Coins from the Victor A. Adda Collection until June 2018. Haim Gitler describes the exhibition and the story of arguably “one of the century’s major collections of Roman gold coins”. more ]

ANS provides online image-zooming feature

The American Numismatic Society will make its highest-resolution images available. With 160,000 numismatic objects photographed thus far, this will enable researchers to zoom down into minute details, in order to assist them in their work. more ]

More Good News about the Huntington Collection

Thanks to the generosity of an anonymous friend of the ANS, approximately 9,000 additional Huntington coins have been purchased and will be placed on long-term loan to the ANS. Thus more than half of the collection has been regained. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 3

Can you hazard a guess as to which European country is the most mountainous after Switzerland? Austria? Not a chance! It’s Spain. And besides being incredibly mountainous, Spain can also boast the best-preserved Roman city wall anywhere in the world. Join us on the third leg of our incredible trip as we make our way to the Picos de Europa and then to Lugo. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain (2012)

In April 2012 Ursula Kampmann travelled through Northern Spain. During the summer she published her numismatic diary of this travel. Here you can read all single parts. more ]

Numismatic Northern Spain – Part 6

You’ve probably never heard of Las Médulas. And yet, this site of the most important gold mines of the Roman Empire is now a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. The landscape of Las Médulas is staggeringly beautiful, so much so that we were distracted to the point of nearly getting completely lost. more ]

The coinage of the Iranian huns and their successors

Covering Bactria to Gandhara, the 4th to the 8th century AD, a two-volume catalog published by Klaus Vondrovec examines the coinage of the Iranian huns and their successors. Ursula Kampmann has taken a closer look at it. more ]

Welcome to Iran! Part 11: Persepolis! At last!

If ever there was a reason why I wanted to travel Iran, it was Persepolis, the capital of the Persians with its incredible Apadana. Finally the day has come. We are going to see the city of cities! more ]

Lycian coins

Lycian coins in European private collections – that is the title of Wilhelm Müseler’s latest publication. It turned out to be much more than a simple catalogue. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Hoards in Syria

Frédérique Duyrat has published a weighty monograph on hoards in Syria. It is more than a numismatic study. The author asks the fundamental question how and when all the Syrian coins were incorporated into Western collections. Ursula Kampmann took a look. more ]

3,500 kg ancient coins discovered in China

According to Chinese reports, archaeologists excavated about 3,500 kg of ancient coins in Inner Mongolia, which is located in Northern China. Most of the coins date back to the Han Dynasty. more ]

The History of Chinese Coinage

Quite rightly, China prides itself of its long history, impressively evidenced by the Chinese monetary tradition that took a different route than our western one. In three parts Ursula Kampmann describes this intriguing development. more ]

More than a Tomb – a Money Safe

Tons of bronze coins, and precious gold! These are the astonishing findings from ongoing excavations at a site of a tomb in Jiangxi Province (China) dated to the Western Han Dynasty (202 B.C. to A.D. 8). more ]

International Symposium “Byzantine Gold Coins in the World of Late Antiquity”

In Changchun (China) an International Symposium on “Byzantine Gold Coins in the World of Late Antiquity” will take place from 23 to 25 June 2017. Central questions deal with globalisation and cultural exchange between East and West. more ]

Chinese coins from a scholar’s study at the Ashmolean

“Chinese coins from the scholar’s study” is a new exhibition at the Money Gallery in the Ashmolean Museum. This special display presents Chinese antiquarian taste for coin collecting and is open until September 24th, 2017. more ]

The monetary history of China

Are you interested in the monetary history of China? It encompasses everything you can imagine: from pre-monetary currency to the first bills. François Thierry has compiled all this in a handbook spanning 700 pages. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Spectacular gold coins found in Iraq

According to media reports archaeologists discovered 66 Sassanid gold coins in the city of Aziziyah in the south-west of Baghdad. The coins were expected to be sent for laboratory tests in order to confirm their authenticity. more ]

Sylloge Nummorum Sasanidarum – Uzbekistan

Three things are the basis of numismatics: material, material, material. The Sylloge volumes on Sasanian numismatics make this material accessible to researchers. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look at one of the volumes. more ]

Princeton acquires Schaaf Collection of Sasanian Coins

The Princeton University Numismatic Collection announced the acquisition of one of the most comprehensive collections of Sasanian coins in private hands, that of Robert W. Schaaf, a New Jersey resident employed in the electronics field. more ]

Welcome to Iran! Part 11: Persepolis! At last!

If ever there was a reason why I wanted to travel Iran, it was Persepolis, the capital of the Persians with its incredible Apadana. Finally the day has come. We are going to see the city of cities! more ]

Gems, rings and seal boxes from Caesarea Maritima

In 2016, a content-rich book on a private collection of gems, finger rings and seal boxes was written in Tel Aviv. The objects of the collection all have one common trait: they were all found in Caesarea Maritima. Ursula Kampmann has taken a look. more ]

Globalisation in Roman times: Trade with India

In the upcoming auction of Künker on 13 March 2017, several interesting aurei are going to be put to auction. They are Indian imitations of Roman gold coins, which bespeak the close trade relations between Rome and the Indian subcontinent. more ]

Treasures of the Gupta Empire

Sanjeev Kumar is an independent researcher and numismatist who has spent an entire lifetime studying the history and coinage of the Gupta Empire. He has now published a monograph on the entire coinage of the Gupta Dynasty and the related dynasties of Bengal. more ]

Human faces

Why was the human head the motif on coins for centuries, no, for millennia? And why did that change in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann is looking for answers to these questions in her book “Menschengesichter” (“Human faces”), from which the texts in this series are taken. more ]

The Thirty Years' War

Both religion and power were the focal points of the Thirty Years’ War that shook the whole of Europe during the 17th century. Ursula Kampmann brings that era alive. more ]

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