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Coin Invest Trust designs coins on historic changes in the Vatican

July 18, 2013 – Coin Invest Trust has designed a series of coins that pay tribute to a historically significant event: the first resignation of a pope since the Middle Ages. As well as depicting Francis, successor of Benedict XVI, the coins also depict the first harmonious relationship between former and new pope in the history of the Catholic Church.

Cook Islands / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.Cook Islands / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.

Cook Islands / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.

The picture elements on both sides are matted on a polished field. The front of the coin features a portrait of the Cook Islands’ Head of State, Queen Elizabeth II, as well as her name, Elizabeth II. The name of the issuing country, Cook Islands, appears along the edge, as does the nominal value, 5 dollars.
The reverse shows a frontal view bust of Pope Benedict XVI in full regalia, with mitre and papal crosier, the right hand extended in blessing. On the left edge are the words Resignation of Benedict XVI and underneath it, February 28, 2013. The coin is issued in silver, as well as in gold-plated copper and gold; while the gold-plated copper coin is minted in proof-like quality, the silver and gold versions are minted in proof.

Cook Islands / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.Cook Islands / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.

Cook Islands / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.

The design elements of the Pope Francis coin are also matted on a polished base. The front of the coin features the same design as that of Benedict’s resignation.
The reverse shows a frontal view bust of Pope Francis in full regalia, his right hand raised in blessing. St. Peter's Basilica and the Papal Palace are depicted in the background, as seen from St. Peter’s Square. Along the upper edge are the words Habemus Papam (we have a pope), and below them the year of issue, 2013. The Pope’s Latin name, Franciscus, appears on the bottom edge. The coin is issued in silver, as well as in gold-plated copper and gold; while the gold-plated copper coin is minted in proof-like quality, the silver and gold versions are minted in proof.

Palau / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.Palau / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.

Palau / 5 Dollars / Silver .925 / 20 g / 38.61 mm / Mintage: 2,013.

The picture elements on both sides are matted on a polished base. The front of the coin features the coat of arms of the issuing country, and the name of it also appears on the upper edge: Republic of Palau. The nominal value of 5 $ is indicated on the lower edge. The reverse of the coin shows a profile-view bust of Benedict XVI and Francis, their hands upon each other’s shoulders. Displayed along the edge, next to each pope, is his official coat of arms. At the top are the words The Historic Meeting, and below them, the year of issue, 2013. And below this, in turn, is a simple Latin cross. Appearing to the left of it, above the portrait of Pope Francis are the words Pope Francis and to the right, above the portrait of Benedict XVI, Benedict XVI.

Pope Benedict on St Peter's Square. Photo: Rvin88 / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en

Pope Benedict on St Peter's Square. Photo: Rvin88 / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en

The news of Benedict XVI’s resignation came as a surprise to everyone, including his close confidants. Many an attendee questioned his own knowledge of Latin when the Pope announced in a meeting that he had decided to resign, feeling that he had reached the edge of his capacity to carry out his duties.

Main panel of a triptych with St Peter Celestine (pope Celestine V) and monks. Photo: Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikipedia.

Main panel of a triptych with St Peter Celestine (pope Celestine V) and monks. Photo: Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikipedia.

When Pope Celestine V abdicated in 1294, he had just recently issued the edict that stipulated under which circumstances the head of the Catholic Church was permitted to resign. In those days, however, the pope was also a worldly ruler of considerable power and, as such, Celestine posed a threat to his successor, who then imprisoned him in ‘honourable captivity’ until his death. Since then, no other pope has resigned, although the possibility existed. Benedict XVI availed himself of this option and vacated his seat on February 28, 2013, then left the Vatican.

Pope Francis during a meeting. Photo: Agência Brasil / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/br/deed.pt

Pope Francis during a meeting. Photo: Agência Brasil / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/br/deed.pt

By the second day of the conclave – the assembly of voting cardinals who elect a new Pope – the Argentinian cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio had already found a majority. On March 13, the Cardinal Protodeacon Jean-Louis Tauran introduced him to the public from the balcony of St. Peter’s Square with the traditional words: ‘Habemus Papam Franciscum’ (we have a pope, Francis). His accession to office was marked by his surprising modesty and down-to-earth appearance, and it’s along these lines that he assumed the name Francis. This was in reference to Francis of Assisi, who was perhaps the most ardent proponent of a life of poverty that the Catholic Church has ever had.

On March 23, 2013, a few days after the official inauguration of Francis, a historic encounter took place in Castel Gandolfo between the former pope emeritus and his successor. Unlike in the Middle Ages, Benedict XVI promised his absolute loyalty to the new Pope and their meeting was cordial and harmonious.

The coins were minted by B.H. Mayer’s Kunstprägeanstalt GmbH. Collectors can purchase the issues through specialty dealers.

For more information on these coins and the various specifications available pleae visit the website of Coin Invest Trust.

For all information regarding the Holy See you should take a look at the Vatican website.

You may even try the Latin version

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